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Colostethus pratti Boulenger 1899

Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)
Colostethus pratti
Colostethus pratti (Pratt's rocket frog)
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Common name

Pratt's Rocket Frog

Identification

Adult

Species description based on Savage (1968). A small frog. Males and females are similarly sized (to about 24 mm), but can be distinguished because males have mottling on the throat whereas females throats are white. The third finger of adult males is swollen.

Dorsal

The dorsal surface is dark brown, bordered on either side by a lighter dorsolateral stripe.

Colostethus pratti Dorsal 1 Colostethus pratti Dorsal 2

Concealed surfaces

Lateral surface dark except for a light stripe (sometimes fragmented) extending from the groin to halfway to the eye. Rear surface of thighs have two dark marks above and below a central light line.

Colostethus pratti Concealed surfaces 1 Colostethus pratti Concealed surfaces 2

Extremities

Feet have no webbing between the toes.

Life history

Tadpole

Tadpoles are pale in color (Savage 1968). Some brown flecks may be present on the dorsal surface (Savage 1968). Mouthparts consist of two upper (one continuous and one partial) and three lower teethrows (Savage 1968).

Ecology behavior and evolution

Ecology

Colostethus pratti populations are likely beginning to decline east of the Panama Canal due to the spread of chytrid fungus to that region (Woodhams et al 2008).

Taxonomy and systematics

Taxonomy

Authority

Boulenger 1899

Synonyms

Phyllobates pratti

Type locality

Santa Ines, N. of Medellin, Republic of Colombia; altitude 3800 feet

Habitat and distribution

Habitat

Lowland forest to 1600 m.

Countries

countries
Colombia, Panama

Map

Colostethus pratti distribution
Distrubution map (IUCN)

Bibliography

Boulenger, GA. 1899. Descriptions of new batrachians in the collection of the British Museum (Natural History). Annals and Magazine of Natural History, Series 7 3: 273-277.

Edwards, SR. 1971. Taxonomic notes on South American Colostethus with descriptions of two new species (Amphibia, Dendrobatidae). Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 84: 147-162.

Grant, T, DR Frost, JP Caldwell, R Gagliardo, CFB Haddad, PJR Kok, DB Means, BP Noonan, WE Schargel, and WC Wheeler. 2006. Phylogenetic systematics of dart-poison frogs and their relatives (Amphibia: Athesphatanura: Dendrobatidae). Sistemática filogenética de las ranas venenosas y sus afines (Amphibia: Athesphatanura: Dendrobatidae). Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 299: 1-262.

Hailman, JP and RG Jaeger. 1974. Phototactic responses to spectrally dominant stimuli and use of colour vision by adult anuran amphibians: A comparative survey. Animal Behaviour 22(4): 757-795.

Ibáñez, R, F Solís, C Jaramillo, and AS Rand. 2000. An overwiew of the herpetology of Panama. In: Johnson, JD, RG Webb, and OA Flores-Villela. Eds. Mesoamerican Herpetology: Systematics, Zoogeography and Conservation, pp. 159-170. The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas.

Ruiz-Carranza, PM, MC Ardila-Robayo, and JD Lynch. 1996. Lista actualizada de la fauna de Amphibia de Colombia. Revista de la Academia Colombiana de Ciencias Exactas, Físicas y Naturales 20: 365-415.

Savage, JM. 1968. The dendrobatid frogs of Central America. Copeia 1968(4): 745-776.

Toft, CA. 1980. Seasonal variation in populations of Panamanian litter frogs and their prey: a comparison of wetter and drier sites. Oecologia 47(1): 34-38.

Vences, M, J Kosuch, R Boistel, CFB Haddad, E La Marca, S Loetters, and M Veith. 2003. Convergent evolution of aposematic coloration in Neotropical poison frogs: A molecular phylogenetic perspective. Organisms Diversity and Evolution 3: 215-226.

Woodhams, DC, VL Kilburn , LK Reinert, J Voyles , D Medina, RIbáñez, AD Hyatt, DG Boyle, JD Pask, DM Green, and LA Rollins-Smith. 2008. Chytridiomycosis and amphibian population declines continue to spread eastward in Panama. EcoHealth 5(3): 268-274.

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